Better Cycling, Safer Cycling – Tips and Upcoming Biking and Commuting Skills Classes

Bike Station

Getting back on your bike as adult,  tackling the busy streets as a bike commuter or trying to teach your kids how to ride their bike safely and smartly can all be daunting tasks that make you want to hang up the helmet and just take the bus.  We weren’t born with wheels and if some of the folks out there riding are any indication, we weren’t born with the innate knowledge of how to safely handle a bike either.   Be smart and be safe on your bike,  get some tips on urban commuting, and let the League of American Bicyclists give you a hand.

Chicago Traffic

The League has certified  LCIs (League Cycling Instructors) who teach classes around the country on Traffic Skills 101, Traffic Skills 201,  Commuting, Motorist Education, Kids 1 (for parents), Kids II (for 5th & 6tth graders).  They are kicking off their fall schedule with courses scheduled from Alaska to Maine.  We’ve got classes coming up in Illinois in late October both in the city as well as in Northbrook.  You can find their schedule of upcoming classes on their website as well as full class descriptions.

And as a mini-refresher course, here’s  a good article fron the  Chicago Tribune last week about how to bike defensively in traffic.  The article spells out ten typical and potentially dangerous situations that can occur while riding with cars and the best way in which to avoid getting hit. The short version is to stay alert and often take the lane  – meaning stay as far left as you can or even in the middle of the lane to avoid being doored,  and stay behind stopped cars at lights, not over on the right, so that drivers see you.   Any other good city riding tips?

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  • http://letsgorideabike.com/blog Dottie

    Riding as far to the left as necessary is the most important tip for riding in the city. Doors, doors, everywhere!

    • http://www.dingdingletsride.com Samantha

      I agree! There is a bike-safety video out there (did you post it on your site once?) that shows very clearly how much room you need to allow for doors – that even the far left side of a typical Chicago bike lane is not far left enough!